UNESCO

Time to say goodbye to stereotypes

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This article was published in the printed version of the GIMUN Chronicles, the newspaper of GIMUN’s Annual Conference 2016, two months ago. We thought we’d give you a chance to rediscover it!

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By Michelle Bognuda

In today’s world, people are forced to leave their homeland because of wars. January and February are particularly special months for Ticino’s young people because this is the time when carnival celebrations take place. Although these two statements do not seem to be linked, this year there was a logical connection. Swiss cantons which border other countries, such as Ticino or Geneva, are particularly touchy about immigrants, people in search of political asylum and, last but not least, cross-border workers. Read the rest of this entry »

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Education of Young Girls During war: A Look at the Global Situation

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Reprinted from GIMUN Chronicles

By Ghada Ben Saïd

Translated by Amy Reid

Photo: flickr.com/World Bank Photo Collection
Photo: flickr.com/World Bank Photo Collection

In the event of a crisis, it is children who are the first to suffer the effects of the political and economic instability of a country. In a country in conflict, schools are very often damaged or even destroyed, something which encourages parents to refuse to send their children to school. School buildings are also used as temporary residences or for military means. The authorities are so preoccupied with war that the education of these children is often pushed into the background. Many flee from zones of conflict, but for those who do not migrate, life becomes all the more difficult.  This is the case for example, in Syria. Since the beginning of the war, the rate of schooling in the country has dropped drastically.  Syria, despite having a rate of schooling of 95% in 2006, today has the second lowest rate of schooling in the world. Young girls are the first to bear the brunt of this.  Since the beginning of the war, the number of forced marriages amongst young Syrian girls has doubled.  Of the 101 million out-of-school children in the world today, the majority are girls, excluded from the education system and deprived of their basic right to education.

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