Japan

Japan’s ‘Yoshida Doctrine’ as It Stands Today

Posted on Updated on

by Nayana Das

Statue of former Prime Minister Yoshida Shigeru in Kitanomaru Park in Tokyo, Japan. Photo by  Toshihiro Gamo/ Flickr.
Statue of former Prime Minister Yoshida Shigeru in Kitanomaru Park in Tokyo, Japan.
Photo by Toshihiro Gamo/ Flickr.

The basic premise for Japan’s foreign policy in the aftermath of World War II was laid by then Prime Minister Yoshida Shigeru’s diplomatic ‘grand strategy’ known as the Yoshida Doctrine. The strategy which sought to make reconstruction of Japan’s domestic economy as the top policy priority, comprises of three key elements: reconstruction of domestic economy through an emphasis on economic relations overseas, maintenance of a low profile in international politics and reliance on security guarantees from the United States.

Read the rest of this entry »

Oil Conflict in The Orient: Japan’s Justification

Posted on Updated on

By Regina Oladipo

taken from: http://priceofoil.org/2012/09/19/japanese-china-conflict-all-about-oil/
taken from: http://priceofoil.org/2012/09/19/japanese-china-conflict-all-about-oil/

The tension between Japan and China has been increasing over the years, concerning island territory and the access that these islands have to oil and gas reserves. The Senkaku (Japan) and Diouyi (China) islands both have perimeters of 7 kilometers that overlap one another within the East and South China Sea. In the midst of this overlap, lies the approximate area of the Chunxiao gas field. The strength of historical disputes is so unfortunate in this case as Japan and China in negotiations is an economic and industrial force to be reckoned with. Journalists stress a need for “a bilateral trade between the two Asian powers estimated at some $300 billion”. This puts into perspective the worth of the natural resources in this particular area and equally magnifies the friction between China and Japan who both want to claim it themselves. Read the rest of this entry »