GIMUN

The GIMUN conference was like a moment out of time.

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Preparation week end at UNIbastion
Selfie-time! Preparation week at Uni-Bastions. By Loubna Chatta.

 

By Loubna Chatta

About five months ago now, hundreds of students from all around the world were reunited at the UN headquarters in Geneva for the annual GIMUN conference.  During a week, time stopped, and almost all boundaries vanished.  The excitement around this event is like no other!  It starts when you first apply to participate. For most of us I think, it began with a leap of faith and a few expectations here and there.  Until we received that first email, the kind that turns your day around. It says: ”Congratulations, you have been selected for the 18Th annual conference of GIMUN”

 And that’s when the real adventure begins…

 

Fun Final Group picture
Photo by Tatyana Gancheva.

 

All of us, no matter the mission, we had during this conference had to get to work at that point. Whether it was, writing study guides, designing the Journal (GIMUN chronicles), setting up the program, preparing proposals and much more.

Then came the Big day. On March 25th. We all met at UNI Bastion in Geneva, and even though we were all over eighteen, we could sense this childlike feeling, in the atmosphere, that one can experience at every age when discovering a new world, or getting into one that he or she loves.

It was a Saturday, the first day of the preparation week-end; leading towards our very first day of work inside the UN, on Monday. Meeting the people that we talked to on WhatsApp or via email, for the first time, sharing first impressions and expectations, and of course running around getting everything ready for the conference.

During our week and the UN headquarters, I felt like we all lived a life-changing experience, to a greater or lesser degree.

When I started my work as a journalist, I was immediately impressed with the involvement of the delegates, who for most of them seemed so young, but so well prepared and passionate about their subjects.

 

Fun timea at Ethno Bar.
Fun time at Ethno bar with Ghanaian team.

 

Watching them throughout the week, getting more comfortable and professional each day, made me understand their love for diplomacy. It, in fact, holds the great power to bring people’s mind’s together, before and beyond anything else. Diplomacy is a chance to really communicate and be heard, as there are so few in the outside world.

My personal experience was not only a fulfilling professional one but also a very enriching human one. First with the Press and Media team, which I think wouldn’t be exaggerated to qualify as “my family for a week.“ And with all the USG’s I got to interview and learn about behind the scenes work.

 

Geneva Tour
Geneva Tour.

 

And finally, comes this one encounter that leaves us with the best memories, and the motivation to keep up the good work. I had the chance to meet and share moments with people who traveled all the way from Egypt, USA, or Ghana for example, and I realize we share the same hopes and values…and even the same humor!

A youthful boost for world governance

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Source: Foraus

By Nataliya Borys, translated by Aymeric Jacquier.

Would you like to communicate directly with the Director-General of the United Nations Office at Geneva about global issues? Do you think this is practically impossible? Well, the think-tank Foraus and the Global Studies Institute made this possible for an evening. Read the rest of this entry »

Join us ! Call for Editor-in-chief and Head of Translators

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GIMUN is a student-led NGO with special consultative status at the UN ECOSOC. Our goal is to educate about the UN and to promote the UN values amongst the Youth. One of our projects is this online blog “UNO, You Know ?!”.We give students with an interest in writing the chance to get accredited to the negotiations and events held at the UN and publish their articles here.

We are now recruiting to complete our management team for the blog. If you are a student, interested in international relations and in GIMUN, with very good skills in both english and french, here is your chance to contribute to our bilingual online journal. You will have the opportunity to manage a multicultural team, composed of journalists and translators from all over the world. You will then take responsibilities in our NGO. Read the rest of this entry »

International Peace and Security at my expense? Economic Sanctions – A philosophical comment

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This article was published in the printed version of the GIMUN Chronicles, the newspaper of GIMUN’s Annual Conference 2016, last March. We thought we’d give our readers a chance to rediscover it!

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By Laura Carolin Freitag

In light of the horrors of World War II, the United Nations (UN) came into existence charged with one central mission: the maintenance of international peace and security. Established in the name of “We the Peoples”, the United Nations Member States promised mankind to unite their strengths in order to bring about a world free from the scourge of war; a world in which men and women could lead a secure life. Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter enunciates the tools that are at the Member States’ disposal when this mission runs into danger. Read the rest of this entry »

Female entrepreneurship: laws are not enough

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By Nour Honein

While there is much concern over the lack of female entrepreneurs in first world countries, the gender gap in developing countries is even greater. Poverty, lack of proper identifying information, and little to no access to banking services leave more than 1.3 billion women out of the formal financial system (World Bank). These women then lack the basic financial tools necessary for asset ownership and economic empowerment. But is this the only obstacle? Read the rest of this entry »

Failure to Protect and UN Responsibility: The Need for Institutional Mechanisms to Strengthen United Nations’ Accountability in Peacekeeping Contexts

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Source : Marco Dormino / ONU

By Nayana Das,

Ever since the onset of peacekeeping operations (PKOs) under the United Nations’ umbrella, several incidents have risen. During these incidents, several humanitarian missions have failed to act in accordance with their aim. For instance, in 1994, the Rwandan genocide occurred despite the presence of an active UN peacekeeping operation. Likewise, in 1995, UNPROFOR/UNPF failed to prevent the massacre of up to 6,000 persons in Srebrenica during the Bosnian war. In 2010, poor sanitation facilities at the UN’s MINUSTAH base in Meye caused the cholera epidemic1 that killed almost 8,000 people in Haiti. Moreover, as the number of PKOs has grown over the years, so have widespread accounts of inappropriate behavior and sexual exploitation by peacekeepers around the world2, notably in Haiti, Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Bosnia, Cambodia, East Timor and the DRC.

Such failures undermine the legitimacy of the United Nations as a whole. It is also a violation of the peacekeeping mandate under Chapter VII of the UN Charter and the ‘Responsibility to Protect’ principle, which provides the legal basis for peacekeeping operations. In this light, there is a need for accountability under two circumstances: (1) Failure to protect i.e. institutional accountability; and (2) Sexual exploitation and abuse i.e. criminal accountability. Read the rest of this entry »

Tunisia : Land of Hope in the Arab World

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By Flavio Baroffio

Tunisia is considered to be the cradle of the Arab Spring which has changed drastically the political landscape of the Middle East. It all started in December 2010 when mass protestations broke out in Tunisia because the people were discontent with the economic, political situation and the all-occurring corruption. Shortly after, in January 2011 the former ruler of Tunisia, Ben-Ali, had to step down[1]. Three years later, in 2014, democratic parliamentary elections were held and a new Constitution was adopted. The uprising in Tunisia inspired many other democratic movements in the Arab world, but Tunisia remains the only country where democracy took root. Read the rest of this entry »

Environmentally displaced people: Desertification is creating an inhospitable home for families in the Sahel Zone

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This article was published in the printed version of the GIMUN Chronicles, the newspaper of GIMUN’s Annual Conference 2016, two months ago. We thought we’d give you a chance to rediscover it!

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By Ashli Molina

The Sahel Zone, home to 17 African countries such as Mali, Liberia, Niger, and Chad, has severely felt the effects of climate change. And its people are suffering the irrevocable consequences. Read the rest of this entry »

Time to say goodbye to stereotypes

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This article was published in the printed version of the GIMUN Chronicles, the newspaper of GIMUN’s Annual Conference 2016, two months ago. We thought we’d give you a chance to rediscover it!

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By Michelle Bognuda

In today’s world, people are forced to leave their homeland because of wars. January and February are particularly special months for Ticino’s young people because this is the time when carnival celebrations take place. Although these two statements do not seem to be linked, this year there was a logical connection. Swiss cantons which border other countries, such as Ticino or Geneva, are particularly touchy about immigrants, people in search of political asylum and, last but not least, cross-border workers. Read the rest of this entry »

Super Cyclone Winston hits Fiji, leaving many dead and homeless

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This article was published in the printed version of the GIMUN Chronicles, the newspaper of GIMUN’s Annual Conference 2016, two months ago. Has Fiji had time to recover?

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By Ashli Molina

Super-cyclone Winston, a category five storm, hit Fiji on Sunday, February 21, wiping out entire villages and leaving as many as 42 individuals dead. With winds blasts reaching 325km/h and waves up to 12m high, it has been described as the strongest cyclone in Fiji’s history. Read the rest of this entry »

Calais : the story of a wild “jungle”

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By Sylvia Revello, translated by Gwénaëlle Janiaud

“Rural camp” turned “jungle”: Calais’s refugee camp recently acquired a reputation as “France’s first slum”. The French authorities have spent weeks demolishing the camp. The site, located near the Channel Tunnel, spans several hundred hectares and shelters 3,500-6,000 migrants who have mainly travelled from Syria, Afghanistan, Sudan and Eritrea. Shacks, tents and other makeshift shelters that up until now housed more than 1,000 migrants in the southern part of the camp were torn down by bulldozers and anti-riot police. After a few tense days, which were marked by violent clashes between migrants, activists campaigning against border controls and the police, the evacuation process appears to have been carried out peacefully. As flames slowly engulf the wooden and corrugated iron walls of the migrants’ shacks, some are denouncing this bitter episode, which has done nothing to resolve the migrant crisis. Read the rest of this entry »

Destination ‘Sustainable World 2030’: ready, set, go !

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10th  plenary meeting Closing of the High-level plenary meeting of the United Nations summit for the adoption of the post-2015 development agenda
10th plenary meeting Closing of the High-level plenary meeting of the United Nations summit for the adoption of the post-2015 development agenda

By Ineke De Bisschop

New York, 25th of September 2015: the leaders of all 193 member states of the United Nations sign the agenda ‘Transforming Our World: The 2030 Agenda For Sustainable Development‘. This new development agenda and the successor of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) contains 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and 169 targets with the ultimate goal of eradicating poverty and inequality by 2030. Central pillars of the Agenda are the 5 P’s: people (living in dignity), planet (protecting the planet), prosperity (opportunities for personal development), peace (freedom from fear and violence) and partnership (a renewed global solidarity to leave no one behind). Read the rest of this entry »

Your cameras can free Palestine

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The GIMUN 2016 Annual Conference, held from March 7th to 11th at the Palais des Nations, in Geneva, gathered around 200 students for a model UN. Yes, it was over a month ago, but it turns out the GIMUN Chronicles journalists had not said their last word! When the conference ended, they still had a few more articles left for us…

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Crédit : Facebook / youthagainstsettlement

By Valentina San Martin, translated by John Ryan-Mills

Freedom is relative : although everyone is born free, various laws continually force people to spend their lives living in restricted freedom. As Jean-Jacques Rousseau said, “man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains”.

During the first Arab-Israeli war, which began in 1948,the Israelis took control of a large area of land that still forms part of their state today. The partition which followed this war led to the forced exodus of hundreds of thousands of Palestinians, who for the most part took shelter in neighboring countries such as Lebanon, Jordan, or Syria. At present, Palestine remains an occupied and marginalized territory, owingnotably to the failure of numerous attempts at international negotiation led by powerful nations, but above all to politicians and a dominant media who remain indifferent to a nation that has been subjugated for decades.

This is why in 2012 a non-violent protest group named Youth Against Settlements (YAS) was formed, with the aim of ending the establishment and expansion of illegal Israeli colonies through non-violent protests and civil resistance. Read the rest of this entry »

The (Un)Holy City: Violence Erupts in Jerusalem

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The GIMUN 2016 Annual Conference, held from March 7th to 11th at the Palais des Nations, in Geneva, gathered around 200 students for a model UN. Yes, it was over a month ago, but it turns out the GIMUN Chronicles journalists had not said their last word! When the conference ended, they still had a few more articles left for us…

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epa04298597 Palestinians throw stones on Israeli police (not seen) at Al-Aqsa compound in the old city of Jerusalem, at the end of the first Friday prayer in the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, 04 July 2104. Israeli authorities limited the age of Muslims from West Bank allowed to enter Al-Aqsa Mosque by the age of 50 for men and 40 for women, a very low numbers of Palestinians mange to attend the prayer. EPA/MAHFOUZ ABU TURK

 

By Gilad Bronshtein

Jerusalem has no single past. The historical narrative of the holy city is as changing as its ethnic and religious diversity. Home to some of the holiest sites of Israel’s major religions, the shifting identity of Jerusalem is made and remade with each telling of its long history. However, an unbearable consistency is provided by the reality of conflict within the disputed city. Jerusalem has long been a symbol of the fragile coexistence and volatile tension that underlie the nature of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Read the rest of this entry »

Germany: the scale has officially tipped towards the right

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The GIMUN 2016 Annual Conference, held from March 7th to 11th at the Palais des Nations, in Geneva, gathered around 200 students for a model UN. Yes, it was a month ago, but it turns out the GIMUN Chronicles journalists had not said their last word! When the conference ended, they still had a few more articles left for us…

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Michelle Bognuda

About one month ago, Germany had an important weekend. Three state elections happened, and now that the results are published, it is official: radical right-wing parties are gaining more and more power. On March 13th, the states of Saxony-Anhalt, Rhineland-Palatinate and Baden-Württemberg cast their ballots. This is an important test for Angela Merkel and her Christlich Demokratische Union Deutschlands (“Christian Democratic Union of Germany”, CDU) party, because, even though the three states have different political scenarios, polls predicted that radically right-wing Alternative für Deutschland (“Alternative for Germany”, AfD) would have had the best of the race. Read the rest of this entry »

Current state of affairs in Syria

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The GIMUN 2016 Annual Conference, held from March 7th to 11th at the Palais des Nations, in Geneva, gathered around 200 students for a model UN. Yes, it was a month ago, but it turns out the GIMUN Chronicles journalists had not said their last word! When the conference ended, they still had a few more articles left for us…

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Press Conference Intra-Syrian Talks with Bashar Ja’afari representative of the Syrian Arab Republic to the UN, Geneva, 2016.03.16. UN Photo/Anne-Laure Lechat.

 

By Taner Toraman

As the peace talks are gearing up in Geneva, major changes have been recently taking place in Syria. The cessation of hostilities has been holding, by and large, for two weeks now, which enabled humanitarian aid to reach hundreds of thousands of Syrians. During a press encounter on March 9, the United Nations Special Envoy for Syria, Staffan de Mistura, informed the world about what has been achieved so far on the ground. Read the rest of this entry »

Is the world turning back to authoritarianism ?

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By Cristina Valdés Argüelles

The 23rd of February 2016, the Geneva Summit for Human Rights and Democracy took place in Geneva, assembling hundreds of activists, human rights promoters, former political prisoners from China, Cuba, Iran, Venezuela, among other countries, international human rights NGOs and interested listeners. This ceremony is held every year to lay the cards on the table ; to examine the international current situation ; to address actual human rights violations ; to listen to testimonies of true human rights heroes; to promote democracy and freedom ; to join forces so as to find solutions and, most important, to make the world a better place to live.

During the conference, an interesting discussion came up: Over the past decade, totalitarian authorities have raised and gained more power internationally, repressing the growth of democracy and undermining the population’s rights and values. It might be assumable that humanity, after more than three million years of evolution since the Australopithecus apheresis Lucy, has reached a great level of evolution and promotion of the values of human rights. However, the reality of the global arena seems to point into the opposite direction. Is the world coming back to authoritarianism? Read the rest of this entry »

RIMUN Delegation 2016

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By Flavio Baroffio

Once again GIMUN was sending a delegation to a MUN conference organized by Sciences Po Reims. This time the delegation was headed to the French city of Reims, the capital of champagne. Read the rest of this entry »

GIMUN 2016: The WHO committee proposes concrete solutions

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The GIMUN 2016 Annual Conference, held from March 7th to 11th at the Palais des Nations, in Geneva, gathered around 200 students for a model UN. In the past few days, we have had the honour of publishing reports on the six committees’ debates, brought to you by the journalists of the GIMUN Chronicles.

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By Rosalyne Reber, translated by Marie-Ambrym Thivoyon

After a week full of emotions, new experiences and knowledge sharing, GIMUN’s 17th Annual Conference ended with a very moving and impressive closing ceremony during which appreciation for the work carried out by the event’s organisers over the last few months was shown and their roles were explained. This conference, which took place in the impressive setting of the Palais des Nations in Geneva, was a great success. Read the rest of this entry »

GIMUN 2016 : For the DISEC Committee, an intense and rewarding week

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The GIMUN 2016 Annual Conference, held from March 7th to 11th at the Palais des Nations, in Geneva, gathered around 200 students for a model UN. In the next few days, we will have the honour of publishing reports on the six committees’ debates, brought to you by the journalists of the GIMUN Chronicles.

By Noémie Stockhammer, translated by John Ryan-Mills

Summing up a week like the one we just had promises to be a complex task, in part due to the sheer number of things to talk about for me to fully cover the week in its entirety. But all the same, I’m going to try. Read the rest of this entry »

Security Council: An eventful week for GIMUN’s enfant terrible!

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The GIMUN 2016 Annual Conference, held from March 7th to 11th at the Palais des Nations, in Geneva, gathered around 200 students for a model UN. In the next few days, we will have the honour of publishing reports on the six committees’ debates, brought to you by the journalists of the GIMUN Chronicles.

By Anaïs Anthoine-Milhomme, translated by John Ryan-Mills

 The week of debates in the Security Council was certainly problematic. Kicking off with a discussion of the principles and definition of cyberwarfare, the States were interrupted by a major crisis. The attack on the Indian embassy in Kabul, in Afghanistan, would lead to a series of disturbances within the Council. Debates were then centered on this crisis: how would the Council deal with such an important attack? How would they be able to help the hostages who still remained in the embassy? Read the rest of this entry »

GIMUN 2016: HRC – A week of ups, downs, and strides forward

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The GIMUN 2016 Annual Conference, held from March 7th to 11th at the Palais des Nations, in Geneva, gathered around 200 students for a model UN. In the next few days, we will have the honour of publishing reports on the six committees’ debates, brought to you by the journalists of the GIMUN Chronicles.

HRC

By Ashli Molina

After five days, 30+ hours, and several coffee breaks, the Human Rights Council succeeded in debating topics pertinent to our global society. Read the rest of this entry »

GIMUN 2016 : Concrete Solutions for the Legal Committee

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The GIMUN 2016 Annual Conference, held from March 7th to 11th at the Palais des Nations, in Geneva, gathered around 200 students for a model UN. In the next few days, we will have the honour of publishing reports on the six committees’ debates, brought to you by the journalists of the GIMUN Chronicles.

By Emilie Lopes Franco, translated by John Ryan-Mills

For the Legal Committee, the week proved itself to be rich in emotions. The first debates, about the judgement on peacekeepers who had committed offences while on mission, began with ups and downs. Each State had their own values which were often difficult to put aside. The compromises were the result of long discussions: the key issue was the addition of an independent body to judge the soldiers. On Tuesday evening, the President of the Commission had call the delegates to order: compromises had to be made in order to find a resolution, for the good of everyone. Each delegation aimed to remain open to change and growth. On Wednesday at midday, the resolution for the first subject was finally sent to the presidency. Read the rest of this entry »

GIMUN 2016: A New “Model”, ECOSOC

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The GIMUN 2016 Annual Conference, held from March 7th to 11th at the Palais des Nations, in Geneva, gathered around 200 students for a model UN. In the next few days, we will have the honour of publishing reports on the six committees’ debates, brought to you by the journalists of the GIMUN Chronicles.

ECOSOC

By Roberta Marangi

Thirty hours, twenty-five delegates, five full days, a presidency made of two highly professional members, two journalists, taking turns in recounting all that has happened in the Salle XXVI of the Palais des Nations. And one final report to try and bring back to life all that has happened. Read the rest of this entry »

Flogged for Blogging

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Photo source : RFI

By Flavio Baroffio

When writing my articles for the “UNO, You Know?!” Blog I don’t have to fear to be thrown into jail or being tortured for expressing my opinions. Unfortunately that could happen to me if I lived in Saudi Arabia. The Saudi blogger Raif Badawi is now in jail for already three years because he was doing exactly the same thing I did : expressing his opinion in a blog. His wife Ensaf Haidar, now living in exile in Canada with their three children, was a guest at the Geneva Summit for Human Rights and Democracy. She was interviewed by the journalist Tom Gross. In the following article I would like to share with you the story of Raif Badawi based on the interview given by his wife. Read the rest of this entry »

The E.U. should not be proud of the new refugee deal with Turkey

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As GIMUN’s Annual Conference 2016 is taking place this week, we will be giving you exclusive access to one article a day published in the conference newspaper, at the same moment as the participants and in both of our languages. Check out GIMUN’s website for the full version of the GIMUN Chronicles!

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By Ashli Molina

While Europe agreed to “close” its migrant route, blocking asylum seekers from reaching its soil, Turkey agreed to welcome them into their camps with open arms. This was made possible by a deal—let’s call it a migrant exchange—formed earlier this week at a summit between the European Union and Turkey, who put up a tough fight. The country demanded a lot of financial aid to help refugees stay in Turkey, accelerated talks about joining the E.U., and visa-free travel within the E.U. for Turkish citizens. The new deal, however, betrays European values, human rights, and fails to provide an adequate response regarding the worsening refugee crisis. It is a quick fix that benefits all of Europe. Read the rest of this entry »

The Nicaraguan government denies that the contras are back

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As GIMUN’s Annual Conference 2016 is taking place this week, we will be giving you exclusive access to one article a day published in the conference newspaper, at the same moment as the participants and in both of our languages. Check out GIMUN’s website for the full version of the GIMUN Chronicles!

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Photo credit: Tiomono

By Ashli Molina

Current Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega owns most of the country, controlling elections, Congress, the police, the media, and fuel companies. But Mr. Ortega was once a regular man. He was once a revolutionary, a part of the Sandinistas who helped topple the Somoza dictatorship during the 1960s and 1970s. Now, he is compared to the Somoza government he vehemently criticized in 1979. Read the rest of this entry »

From Cyber Warfare to Cyber Terrorism: An Inevitable Future

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As GIMUN’s Annual Conference 2016 is taking place this week, we will be giving you exclusive access to one article a day published in the conference newspaper, at the same moment as the participants and in both of our languages. Check out GIMUN’s website for the full version of the GIMUN Chronicles!

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By Gilad Bronshtein

Cyber warfare is commonly conceived of as actions taken by one nation-state against another. The majority of these attacks aim to interfere with essential security systems and expose the target to increased threat and cripple its offensive potential. Perhaps the most notorious cyber-attack in history, the 2009 Stuxnet worm has targeted several Iranian based organizations around the world and remained undetected for years. The attack is believed to have been perpetrated in order to disrupt operations in two locations central to the Iranian nuclear program. Read the rest of this entry »

Britain and the EU: Defining Change

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By Frederick Brock

The Context

A recent poll conducted by ORB International put British support for withdrawing from European Union membership at 52%.[1] This figure fluctuates from month to month, with June-September showing a consistent lead for staying in and current support for remaining in the EU at 48%. With such a close race to the finish and a referendum on membership around the corner in 2017, it seems remarkable that the continental press is paying so little attention to what’s going on. The political ramifications of ‘Brexit’ – aka British exit – could be more far reaching than even the migration crisis in terms of its impact on Europe’s future. Read the rest of this entry »

The Yemen Conflict – What Role Does Iran Play?

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By Camille de Félice, translated by Amy Reid and Emily Milne

In the wake of the Arab Spring, Yemen has experienced a series of significant demonstrations. These demonstrations led to President Saleh stepping down in November 2011, and being replaced by Mansour Hadi in February 2012. Quickly, the north of the country was engulfed in rising tensions, which progressively spread to other provinces. Read the rest of this entry »

Desertification: A Regional Issue, But Also A Global One

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Source: UN Photo/Martine Perret

By Didem Eker

Climate has been changing and world is getting warmer day by day. Scientific reports are warning us that climate is changing at an alarming rate. If countries don’t act responsibly on the climate change and desertification subject, the world will be getting warmer by up to 4, 5 C degree within this century.  It is very important to reverse the negative effects of climate change and start recovering. Read the rest of this entry »

GIMUN International Migrants’ Day: Dismantling Myths and Discussing Solutions for the European Migrant ‘Crisis’

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By Nayana Das

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Every year since 2000, the United Nations has been celebrating December 18th as International Migrants Day, the same day on which in 1990 the General Assembly adopted the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families. This year, we celebrate the 25th anniversary of the adoption of this Convention and in commemoration of this day, on 11th December 2015 GIMUN organised an International Migrants Day event at the United Nations Office in Geneva. The occasion brought together 16 young participants for a panel discussion on ‘Legal Solutions for the European Refugee Crisis’ with Guest Speaker Livia Manente, Associate Expert for the Office of the Senior Regional Adviser for Europe and Central Asia at the International Organisation for Migration. Read the rest of this entry »

State-Sponsored Terrorism: A Landscape in Transition

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In light of recent events, GIMUN’s blog has decided to publish a special series on the theme of terrorism. Today, Nayana Das gives us her analysis on how terrorist organisations are supported by States.

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Source: Creative Commons

The sponsorship of terrorism by sovereign States to further foreign policy agendas represents a lethal source for the sustenance of international terrorism today. Such sponsorship came to the fore as a serious multilateral concern in the aftermath of the attacks of September 11, 2001. Read the rest of this entry »

Scanning ISIS: What has been going on in the past year and a half?

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In light of recent events, GIMUN’s blog has decided to publish a special series on the theme of terrorism. This first article will be followed by different perspectives on this subject over the next few weeks, presented to you by various journalists.

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Source: Creative Commons

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GIMUN’s delegation goes to OxIMUN

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By Flavio Baroffio

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Photo credit: OxIMUN

On Friday, November 13th, our OxIMUN adventure finally started. We got up very early and took our flight to London, from where we got onto a bus to Oxford. There, we were welcomed by our last delegate Tim, whom I want thank at this point for all he has been doing for us during the conference. Being an exchange student from Oxford, he shared with us his knowledge of the city, showed us the ways around Oxford and booked delicious restaurants for dinner. We were always thankful to be able to rely on him. After we stowed our luggage at a friend of Tim’s place, the conference could finally begin. Read the rest of this entry »

All change for the GIMUN blog team!

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You may not have not noticed, but over the last few months “UNO You Know!?” has gone through a period of transition, and since the start of the new academic year, the GIMUN blog’s team has changed.  There are now two new editors, a new head of translation, and several new journalists and translators. Read the rest of this entry »

Last Wednesday at the MUN Delegation (week 6)

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By Nour Honein

GIMUN’s MUN Delegation session is drawing to an end. Seems like our delegates-to-be are ready to go out into the “real world”!

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Last Wednesday at the MUN Delegation (week 5)

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By Nour Honein

Last week, MUN Delegation participants were in for a rather special session: a workshop conducted by negotiation expert Henri-Jean Tolone. Thanks to this, the next few weeks’ debates should prove even more interesting!

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Last Wednesday at the MUN Delegation (week 3)

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By Nour Honein

Every week, a participant in this GIMUN activity gives us her perspective on the latest session. Find out what happened in last week’s session…

10847724_879769552065666_1912051882486853041_o Read the rest of this entry »

Last Wednesday at the MUN Delegation (week 2)

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By Nour Honein

Every week, a participant in this GIMUN activity gives us her perspective on the latest session. Find out what happened in last week’s session…

Read the rest of this entry »

Call for Journalists June 2015

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screen-shot-2014-03-02-at-2-26-28-pmAre you an aspiring writer or translator? Would you like to get more practice and publish your work in an established student journal? Are you interested in international news?

Join the team of  UNO You Know !?

Requirements for a writer:
– interest in international affairs and/or law
– availability to dedicate 10 hours per month to the blog

Please send a CV and a short cover letter accompanied by writing samples to blog@gimun.org before 30th June 2015. Applications will be evaluated on a rolling basis.

The European Asylum Policy – Failure of the Dublin III Regulation?

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 by Jan Alexander Linxweiler

It is already hard to imagine what it must feel like to be displaced, to be forced to leave home, to be persecuted and not welcomed anywhere. Even harder to imagine is the horror and despair of those who die while trying to come to a presumed secure and just system – to the EU. On the 30th of September 2013 more then 300 refugees experienced this ordeal off the Italian island of Lampedusa and died in the cause. Since then reports of tragic deaths at the European boarders are becoming more and more frequent, as the number of refugees are increasing. Subsequently the influx of refugees into the EU is increasing as well. At the same time the Common European Asylum System seams to fail in providing adequate protection and reception conditions; resulting in inhuman treatment and deaths.

This paper wants to offer a reasonable and possible solution within the existing Asylum System. Therefore it presents the Refuge Protection within the two dimensions: the Geneva Convention relating to the Status of Refugees and the Common European Asylum System. Within the Common European Asylum System the paper focuses upon the definition of the refugee status and the Dublin System. After presenting and discussing the weaknesses of this exact System the paper will present (in short) a possible solution to the raised problems and weaknesses. Read the rest of this entry »

Land grabbing – NGOs giving the UN a push

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by Tuuli Orasmaa

pepsi
On 15th April, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) released a news brief celebrating a second multinational company’s, PepsiCo’s, decision to support international guidelines on sustainable land tenure governance. The first one, Coca-Cola Company, made the move in November 2013. But why is this news worth noting? First of all, this may be seen as an important step in the fight against the global “land grabbing” phenomenon and secondly, this shows the power civil society organizations may have in issues the United Nations is struggling with. Read the rest of this entry »

Sustainability, Equity and Growth – Change is the Key

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Palais de Nations, Geneva

by Alina Suvila

It seems like a never-ending discussion about sustainable development and climate change. But there is a very good reason for it: now is the time to act. Three notable personalities discussed various possibilities for action in a public conference named ”Sustainable Development on a Warming Planet?” on 24th April 2014 at the Palais de Nations, Geneva. Read the rest of this entry »

A Ladder to Damascus – A film review

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by Leandra Hildbrand and Larissa Spescha

“A ladder to Damascus” is a 2013 drama directed by the Syrian filmmaker Mohamed Malas. It was screened at the “International Oriental Film Festival of Geneva” which took place from 4th to 13th of April. Read the rest of this entry »

Feminist Fangirl: A talk by IR legend J Ann Tickner

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by Sarah Payne

taken from: http://www.american.edu/uploads/profiles/large/SIS%2520Tickner.jpg
taken from: http://www.american.edu/uploads/profiles/large/SIS%2520Tickner.jpg

High on many reading lists on issues of security and feminism, J Ann Tickner is a familiar name for any International Relations student. For this reason, I was really excited to see her deliver a guest lecture at the Graduate Institute Geneva on 14th April 2014, entitled “Dealing with Difference: Problems and Possibilities for Dialogue in International Relations”, and tackling concepts like discrimination and epistemology of discourse  -as problematic and diverse as feminism – all within the hour. Read the rest of this entry »

The Evolving Space Security Regime: Implementation, Compliance and New Initiatives

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So long and thanks for all the fish?

by Euan O’Neill

euan

Whilst ancient astrologers used the position of the stars to tell the future and European explorers used the heavens to cross oceans and find ‘unknown’ territories, today we rely on signals from space to direct us to the nearest branch of Starbucks or to tell us the bus timetable. Read the rest of this entry »

Zaatari: the biggest Syrian town in Jordan

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by Pauline Mettan, translated by Charlotte Grey

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-26908587
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-26908587

Demographic pressure has become too much for our country. Jordan has opened its doors to more than 560,000 Syrian refugees since the conflict began, with 70% being women and children. Within a year, refugees will be 40% of our population. 96% of our energy is imported. Water is scarce. Our budget deficit is sky high. How can we keep up this poor balancing act when wave upon wave of immigrants are draining our already rare resources? Read the rest of this entry »

7 Days in Kigali, and how genocide ripped through Rwanda

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By Yura Azevedo, translated by Lucy Cumming

On Monday 7th April, Rwanda paid tribute to the most extreme genocide in history – 800,000 deaths in less than one hundred days – and one of the bloodiest wars of the 20th century. A mere 20 years ago: the Rwandan Tutsi genocide. Read the rest of this entry »