education

Tunisia : Land of Hope in the Arab World

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©A. LE GALL/DEMOTIX/CORBIS

By Flavio Baroffio

Tunisia is considered to be the cradle of the Arab Spring which has changed drastically the political landscape of the Middle East. It all started in December 2010 when mass protestations broke out in Tunisia because the people were discontent with the economic, political situation and the all-occurring corruption. Shortly after, in January 2011 the former ruler of Tunisia, Ben-Ali, had to step down[1]. Three years later, in 2014, democratic parliamentary elections were held and a new Constitution was adopted. The uprising in Tunisia inspired many other democratic movements in the Arab world, but Tunisia remains the only country where democracy took root. Read the rest of this entry »

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China: Expelling “Western Values” from the Classroom

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Reprinted from GIMUN Chronicles

By Caroline Mountfield

AP Photo/Colour China Photo
AP/Colour China Photo

China has greatly expanded its higher education system as its economy has grown, with the total number of universities and colleges more than doubling in the past decade. Such an impressive outcome was only accomplished by giving priority to providing quality tertiary education across the country. In enacting an “educational innovation system”, China’s objective was to provide a proficient workforce to feed its socio-economic development. This implied setting up courses in key disciplines, talent development, improving research, widening participation and enhancing collaboration between institutions. As elsewhere, academic opportunities in China are shaped by a range of non-educational factors, such as social attitudes and changing patterns of employment and prosperity. However, traditional perspectives and Marxist commitments to fixed social roles and collective identities create a very distinctive structure when moving towards a more inclusive education system. China’s ruling Communist Party has long railed against Western values, including concepts like multi-party democracy, individualism and self-advocacy.

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Education of Young Girls During war: A Look at the Global Situation

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Reprinted from GIMUN Chronicles

By Ghada Ben Saïd

Translated by Amy Reid

Photo: flickr.com/World Bank Photo Collection
Photo: flickr.com/World Bank Photo Collection

In the event of a crisis, it is children who are the first to suffer the effects of the political and economic instability of a country. In a country in conflict, schools are very often damaged or even destroyed, something which encourages parents to refuse to send their children to school. School buildings are also used as temporary residences or for military means. The authorities are so preoccupied with war that the education of these children is often pushed into the background. Many flee from zones of conflict, but for those who do not migrate, life becomes all the more difficult.  This is the case for example, in Syria. Since the beginning of the war, the rate of schooling in the country has dropped drastically.  Syria, despite having a rate of schooling of 95% in 2006, today has the second lowest rate of schooling in the world. Young girls are the first to bear the brunt of this.  Since the beginning of the war, the number of forced marriages amongst young Syrian girls has doubled.  Of the 101 million out-of-school children in the world today, the majority are girls, excluded from the education system and deprived of their basic right to education.

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