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A Bright Future for Northern Nigerian Schoolgirls?

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by Modupe Macaulay 

01-20-2015Nigeria_School
Photo: UN News Centre UNICEF/NYHQ2014-0710/Eseibo

The 15th of April 2014 marked a turning point in Nigerian politics with the kidnapping of over 200 schoolgirls in Chibok, northern Nigeria. The world awakened to the plight of young girls in developing nations pursuing education in societies blighted by terrorism and patriarchal belief systems. However, amidst the turmoil of unspeakable violence can local girls see any hope for the future? 

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Call for Journalists June 2015

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screen-shot-2014-03-02-at-2-26-28-pmAre you an aspiring writer or translator? Would you like to get more practice and publish your work in an established student journal? Are you interested in international news?

Join the team of  UNO You Know !?

Requirements for a writer:
– interest in international affairs and/or law
– availability to dedicate 10 hours per month to the blog

Please send a CV and a short cover letter accompanied by writing samples to blog@gimun.org before 30th June 2015. Applications will be evaluated on a rolling basis.

‘Crops’ or ‘Carats’? Gold mining and cocoa production in Ghana

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By Stephen Yeboah, Research Fellow, Africa Progress Panel

For the past two decades, gold mining and agriculture have contributed consistently to economic growth and development in Ghana. In 2013, gold mining contributed US$3,673 million in exports. Agriculture employed about 60 per cent of the active labour force and cocoa, the leading cash crop, contributed an estimated US$1,731 million in exports in 2013 (Government of Ghana 2013). While farming is the traditional source of livelihood, artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) has emerged in communities endowed with natural resources as a lucrative activity due to its remarkable income-generating potential.

Mining and agriculture may co-exist and interact to generate economic and social benefits, but at the same time they compete for land, water resources and labour. On the one hand, land is seized for mining that otherwise could be used for farming; labour is attracted away from agriculture into mining; and mining pollutes water needed for farm irrigation. On the other hand, mining generates money that supplements the income of farmers who branch out into mining, allowing them to improve the productivity of their farms through buying inputs like fertilizers, and hiring labour (see: Hilson and Garforth 2012; 2013). Despite the importance of mining and agriculture to socio-economic development, the dynamics of their interaction have seldom received attention and are sometimes underestimated by scholars, governments, corporate entities and donors. There is a need for greater understanding of the mining–agriculture nexus to ensure that the two interact in a positive and balanced manner, producing social and economic development without disrupting the livelihoods of rural people whose lives are tied to farming. Read the rest of this entry »

The European Asylum Policy – Failure of the Dublin III Regulation?

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 by Jan Alexander Linxweiler

It is already hard to imagine what it must feel like to be displaced, to be forced to leave home, to be persecuted and not welcomed anywhere. Even harder to imagine is the horror and despair of those who die while trying to come to a presumed secure and just system – to the EU. On the 30th of September 2013 more then 300 refugees experienced this ordeal off the Italian island of Lampedusa and died in the cause. Since then reports of tragic deaths at the European boarders are becoming more and more frequent, as the number of refugees are increasing. Subsequently the influx of refugees into the EU is increasing as well. At the same time the Common European Asylum System seams to fail in providing adequate protection and reception conditions; resulting in inhuman treatment and deaths.

This paper wants to offer a reasonable and possible solution within the existing Asylum System. Therefore it presents the Refuge Protection within the two dimensions: the Geneva Convention relating to the Status of Refugees and the Common European Asylum System. Within the Common European Asylum System the paper focuses upon the definition of the refugee status and the Dublin System. After presenting and discussing the weaknesses of this exact System the paper will present (in short) a possible solution to the raised problems and weaknesses. Read the rest of this entry »

The Evolving Space Security Regime: Implementation, Compliance and New Initiatives

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So long and thanks for all the fish?

by Euan O’Neill

euan

Whilst ancient astrologers used the position of the stars to tell the future and European explorers used the heavens to cross oceans and find ‘unknown’ territories, today we rely on signals from space to direct us to the nearest branch of Starbucks or to tell us the bus timetable. Read the rest of this entry »

Transnational feminisms, governance and development: a talk by Maitrayee Mukhopadhyay

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by Sarah Payne

http://vimeo.com/86510334
http://vimeo.com/86510334

On 10th April 2014, renowned social anthropologist Maitrayee Mukhopadhyay gave a talk at Geneva’s Graduate Insitute (IHEID) entitled “Gender knowledge and expertise in development”. In this lively, interesting and discursive talk Dr Mukhopadhyay discussed the last 30 years of global feminism, its achievements, internal divisions and scope for progress. Crucially though, she evaluated the role of transnational, local and grassroots feminisms in challenging the global hegemony of western feminism, and the implications of this for development. Read the rest of this entry »