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The E.U. should not be proud of the new refugee deal with Turkey

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As GIMUN’s Annual Conference 2016 is taking place this week, we will be giving you exclusive access to one article a day published in the conference newspaper, at the same moment as the participants and in both of our languages. Check out GIMUN’s website for the full version of the GIMUN Chronicles!

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By Ashli Molina

While Europe agreed to “close” its migrant route, blocking asylum seekers from reaching its soil, Turkey agreed to welcome them into their camps with open arms. This was made possible by a deal—let’s call it a migrant exchange—formed earlier this week at a summit between the European Union and Turkey, who put up a tough fight. The country demanded a lot of financial aid to help refugees stay in Turkey, accelerated talks about joining the E.U., and visa-free travel within the E.U. for Turkish citizens. The new deal, however, betrays European values, human rights, and fails to provide an adequate response regarding the worsening refugee crisis. It is a quick fix that benefits all of Europe. Read the rest of this entry »

Ethnic Tension in Ethiopia : Oromo Demonstrations Escalate into Violence

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As GIMUN’s Annual Conference 2016 is taking place this week, we will be giving you exclusive access to one article a day published in the conference newspaper, at the same moment as the participants and in both of our languages. Check out GIMUN’s website for the full version of the GIMUN Chronicles!

Sans titre
sources : http://kwekudee-tripdownmemorylane.blogspot.fr/2013/07/oromo-people-powerful-kushitic-africans.html?m=1

By Gilad Bronshtein

Last February, on the road near the southern Ethiopian town of Shashamane, a bus was carrying a newly-wed bride and her family on their way to a wedding celebration. The party goers were preparing to take part in a traditional Oromo ceremony in a nearby town. With uplifted spirits, the passengers enjoyed traditional Oromo music in anticipation of the happy occasion. The festivities came to an abrupt end when local police pulled the vehicle over and demanded that the celebrations stop. It was not the loud music or a traffic violation that provoked the police. Instead, the officers demanded that the music be turned off, forbidding any display of Oromo tradition in public. After some passengers refused to comply, the officers commenced to pursue and open fire at the vehicle. The celebration quickly turned into a tragedy when two passengers were shot and killed. Read the rest of this entry »

The Nicaraguan government denies that the contras are back

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As GIMUN’s Annual Conference 2016 is taking place this week, we will be giving you exclusive access to one article a day published in the conference newspaper, at the same moment as the participants and in both of our languages. Check out GIMUN’s website for the full version of the GIMUN Chronicles!

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Photo credit: Tiomono

By Ashli Molina

Current Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega owns most of the country, controlling elections, Congress, the police, the media, and fuel companies. But Mr. Ortega was once a regular man. He was once a revolutionary, a part of the Sandinistas who helped topple the Somoza dictatorship during the 1960s and 1970s. Now, he is compared to the Somoza government he vehemently criticized in 1979. Read the rest of this entry »

International Women’s day : What about the 364 other days?

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As GIMUN’s Annual Conference 2016 is taking place this week, we will be giving you exclusive access to one article a day published in the conference newspaper, at the same moment as the participants and in both of our languages. Check out GIMUN’s website for the full version of the GIMUN Chronicles!

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Source: hellogiggles.com

By Valentina San Martin, translated by Aymeric Jacquier

 “One is not born a woman, one becomes one”. Those words were written a few years ago already by Simone de Beauvoir in her famous book “The Second Sex”.

In other words, according to Beauvoir, being a woman is not just a natural biological determinism, but also an imposed and internalized status with all the discriminations that it entails.

In this beginning of March 2016, GIMUN Annual Conference calls all female and male delegates to think and debate over the issue of feminine condition at an international level. Read the rest of this entry »

From Cyber Warfare to Cyber Terrorism: An Inevitable Future

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As GIMUN’s Annual Conference 2016 is taking place this week, we will be giving you exclusive access to one article a day published in the conference newspaper, at the same moment as the participants and in both of our languages. Check out GIMUN’s website for the full version of the GIMUN Chronicles!

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By Gilad Bronshtein

Cyber warfare is commonly conceived of as actions taken by one nation-state against another. The majority of these attacks aim to interfere with essential security systems and expose the target to increased threat and cripple its offensive potential. Perhaps the most notorious cyber-attack in history, the 2009 Stuxnet worm has targeted several Iranian based organizations around the world and remained undetected for years. The attack is believed to have been perpetrated in order to disrupt operations in two locations central to the Iranian nuclear program. Read the rest of this entry »

Britain and the EU: Defining Change

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By Frederick Brock

The Context

A recent poll conducted by ORB International put British support for withdrawing from European Union membership at 52%.[1] This figure fluctuates from month to month, with June-September showing a consistent lead for staying in and current support for remaining in the EU at 48%. With such a close race to the finish and a referendum on membership around the corner in 2017, it seems remarkable that the continental press is paying so little attention to what’s going on. The political ramifications of ‘Brexit’ – aka British exit – could be more far reaching than even the migration crisis in terms of its impact on Europe’s future. Read the rest of this entry »

The Yemen Conflict – What Role Does Iran Play?

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Source : http://elaph.com/

By Camille de Félice, translated by Amy Reid and Emily Milne

In the wake of the Arab Spring, Yemen has experienced a series of significant demonstrations. These demonstrations led to President Saleh stepping down in November 2011, and being replaced by Mansour Hadi in February 2012. Quickly, the north of the country was engulfed in rising tensions, which progressively spread to other provinces. Read the rest of this entry »

Desertification: A Regional Issue, But Also A Global One

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Source: UN Photo/Martine Perret

By Didem Eker

Climate has been changing and world is getting warmer day by day. Scientific reports are warning us that climate is changing at an alarming rate. If countries don’t act responsibly on the climate change and desertification subject, the world will be getting warmer by up to 4, 5 C degree within this century.  It is very important to reverse the negative effects of climate change and start recovering. Read the rest of this entry »

GIMUN International Migrants’ Day: Dismantling Myths and Discussing Solutions for the European Migrant ‘Crisis’

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By Nayana Das

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Every year since 2000, the United Nations has been celebrating December 18th as International Migrants Day, the same day on which in 1990 the General Assembly adopted the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families. This year, we celebrate the 25th anniversary of the adoption of this Convention and in commemoration of this day, on 11th December 2015 GIMUN organised an International Migrants Day event at the United Nations Office in Geneva. The occasion brought together 16 young participants for a panel discussion on ‘Legal Solutions for the European Refugee Crisis’ with Guest Speaker Livia Manente, Associate Expert for the Office of the Senior Regional Adviser for Europe and Central Asia at the International Organisation for Migration. Read the rest of this entry »

State-Sponsored Terrorism: A Landscape in Transition

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In light of recent events, GIMUN’s blog has decided to publish a special series on the theme of terrorism. Today, Nayana Das gives us her analysis on how terrorist organisations are supported by States.

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Source: Creative Commons

The sponsorship of terrorism by sovereign States to further foreign policy agendas represents a lethal source for the sustenance of international terrorism today. Such sponsorship came to the fore as a serious multilateral concern in the aftermath of the attacks of September 11, 2001. Read the rest of this entry »

Scanning ISIS: What has been going on in the past year and a half?

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In light of recent events, GIMUN’s blog has decided to publish a special series on the theme of terrorism. This first article will be followed by different perspectives on this subject over the next few weeks, presented to you by various journalists.

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Source: Creative Commons

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GIMUN’s delegation goes to OxIMUN

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By Flavio Baroffio

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Photo credit: OxIMUN

On Friday, November 13th, our OxIMUN adventure finally started. We got up very early and took our flight to London, from where we got onto a bus to Oxford. There, we were welcomed by our last delegate Tim, whom I want thank at this point for all he has been doing for us during the conference. Being an exchange student from Oxford, he shared with us his knowledge of the city, showed us the ways around Oxford and booked delicious restaurants for dinner. We were always thankful to be able to rely on him. After we stowed our luggage at a friend of Tim’s place, the conference could finally begin. Read the rest of this entry »

All change for the GIMUN blog team!

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You may not have not noticed, but over the last few months “UNO You Know!?” has gone through a period of transition, and since the start of the new academic year, the GIMUN blog’s team has changed.  There are now two new editors, a new head of translation, and several new journalists and translators. Read the rest of this entry »

Last Wednesday at the MUN Delegation (week 6)

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By Nour Honein

GIMUN’s MUN Delegation session is drawing to an end. Seems like our delegates-to-be are ready to go out into the “real world”!

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Last Wednesday at the MUN Delegation (week 5)

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By Nour Honein

Last week, MUN Delegation participants were in for a rather special session: a workshop conducted by negotiation expert Henri-Jean Tolone. Thanks to this, the next few weeks’ debates should prove even more interesting!

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Last Wednesday at the MUN Delegation (week 4)

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By Nour Honein

Every week, a participant in this GIMUN activity gives us her perspective on the latest session. Find out what happened in last week’s session…

12140045_985253738183913_3035538546772679660_o Read the rest of this entry »

Last Wednesday at the MUN Delegation (week 3)

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By Nour Honein

Every week, a participant in this GIMUN activity gives us her perspective on the latest session. Find out what happened in last week’s session…

10847724_879769552065666_1912051882486853041_o Read the rest of this entry »

Last Wednesday at the MUN Delegation (week 2)

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By Nour Honein

Every week, a participant in this GIMUN activity gives us her perspective on the latest session. Find out what happened in last week’s session…

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Did United Nations Peacekeeping achieve what it set out to do?

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By Nayana Das

With the United Nations (UN) having recently celebrated seventy years of the historic UN Charter which was signed on 26 June 1945, an opportune moment has risen for us as an international community to celebrate the many enduring milestones achieved by the organisation since its establishment.

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Last Wednesday at the MUN Delegation (week 1)

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Every week, a participant in this GIMUN activity gives us her perspective on the latest session. Follow the series to keep track of how debates are progressing…

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The Calais Crisis: UN rapporteur slams Britain’s “xenophobic response” to migrants

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by Modupe Macaulay

Photo source: Getty Images.
Photo source: Getty Images.

Images of tracksuit-clad migrants jumping on high-speed locomotives have become the norm of recent. French police reported that they have intercepted over 18,000 clandestine migrants attempting to illegally enter the United Kingdom on lorries, trains and ferries in the first half of 2015 alone. Current reports suggest that approximately 4,000 migrants are living in self-made ghettos on the outskirts of Calais with 100 – 150 new arrivals everyday, all desperate to reach the United Kingdom.

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The European Union: Outmanoeuvred by a Populist Century?

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by Frederick Brock

The number of asylum-seekers who reach the Southern coasts of Europe has soared dramatically since last year as numerous violent conflicts such as the one in Syria continue to force migration. Image source: Flickr/ Royal Navy Media Archive (Creative Commons)
The number of people reaching the Southern coasts of Europe in search for asylum has soared dramatically since last year. Image source: Flickr/ Royal Navy Media Archive (Creative Commons).

The UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Zeid Ra’ad Al Husein, recently criticised a columnist in a British tabloid for ‘inciting racial hatred’ and referring to migrants attempting the Mediterranean crossing as ‘cockroaches.’ [1] The tabloid in question has the widest readership of any paper in Britain. The High Commissioner went on to compare the xenophobia in elements of the British press as akin to that found in propaganda produced by Rwandan media outlets prior to the genocide in the 1990’s. Self-evidently such sentiment has no place in any society that professes to be civilised, however the increasing confidence and impunity with which those not simply on the fringes of the political spectrum, but the mainstream as well, attack migrants is a worrying development for all in Europe. Our history as a continent is an illustration of where divisive, anti-migrant and nationalist rhetoric can lead. The modern migrant crisis, with 1 in every 122 people displaced due to war, environmental pressures and state oppression, is a situation unprecedented in the years since the formation of the European Union. [2] This article will consider the potential havoc the invocation of resurgent nationalist identities across the continent, partially in response to this crisis, could cause to one of the biggest political projects in the modern world: the European Union.

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A Bright Future for Northern Nigerian Schoolgirls?

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by Modupe Macaulay 

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Photo: UN News Centre UNICEF/NYHQ2014-0710/Eseibo

The 15th of April 2014 marked a turning point in Nigerian politics with the kidnapping of over 200 schoolgirls in Chibok, northern Nigeria. The world awakened to the plight of young girls in developing nations pursuing education in societies blighted by terrorism and patriarchal belief systems. However, amidst the turmoil of unspeakable violence can local girls see any hope for the future? 

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Japan’s ‘Yoshida Doctrine’ as It Stands Today

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by Nayana Das

Statue of former Prime Minister Yoshida Shigeru in Kitanomaru Park in Tokyo, Japan. Photo by  Toshihiro Gamo/ Flickr.
Statue of former Prime Minister Yoshida Shigeru in Kitanomaru Park in Tokyo, Japan.
Photo by Toshihiro Gamo/ Flickr.

The basic premise for Japan’s foreign policy in the aftermath of World War II was laid by then Prime Minister Yoshida Shigeru’s diplomatic ‘grand strategy’ known as the Yoshida Doctrine. The strategy which sought to make reconstruction of Japan’s domestic economy as the top policy priority, comprises of three key elements: reconstruction of domestic economy through an emphasis on economic relations overseas, maintenance of a low profile in international politics and reliance on security guarantees from the United States.

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Terrorism and National Liberation Struggles

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reprinted from GIMUN Chronicles

by Camille de Félice, translated by James Hewlett

Flickr/ Israel Defense Forces
Flickr/ Israel Defense Forces

At a time when the use of the word ‘terrorism’ and its derivatives are becoming more and more frequent, and when not even a day goes by without us hearing about Islamist Terrorism, State Terrorism or even the Global War on Terrorism, it is important to remember that, despite various attempts by the United Nations to define it, there is still no universal legal definition for the word.

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Call for Journalists June 2015

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screen-shot-2014-03-02-at-2-26-28-pmAre you an aspiring writer or translator? Would you like to get more practice and publish your work in an established student journal? Are you interested in international news?

Join the team of  UNO You Know !?

Requirements for a writer:
– interest in international affairs and/or law
– availability to dedicate 10 hours per month to the blog

Please send a CV and a short cover letter accompanied by writing samples to blog@gimun.org before 30th June 2015. Applications will be evaluated on a rolling basis.

Bumeràn Chavez: the Truth about Venezuela?

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by Francesca Paschetta

Cover image of
Cover image of “Bumeràn Chavez” by Emili Blasco.

Last February the agents of the Venezuelan security service arrested the mayor of Caracas, Antonio Ledezma, who is now detained in a military jail on charges of attempting a coup to overthrow President Maduro. It is not the first time that a member of the opposition is arrested, but what happened a few months ago represents an escalation in the regime’s repression, because Ledezma is an elected mayor.

The President has ordered the repression of all his political opponents. Many have been barred from the parliament or even exiled. Ordinary citizens who oppose the left-wing regime are barred from jobs in the public sector and from government benefits. Demonstrations, so far, have ended with the death of many protesters, including a number of students.
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China: Expelling “Western Values” from the Classroom

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Reprinted from GIMUN Chronicles

By Caroline Mountfield

AP Photo/Colour China Photo
AP/Colour China Photo

China has greatly expanded its higher education system as its economy has grown, with the total number of universities and colleges more than doubling in the past decade. Such an impressive outcome was only accomplished by giving priority to providing quality tertiary education across the country. In enacting an “educational innovation system”, China’s objective was to provide a proficient workforce to feed its socio-economic development. This implied setting up courses in key disciplines, talent development, improving research, widening participation and enhancing collaboration between institutions. As elsewhere, academic opportunities in China are shaped by a range of non-educational factors, such as social attitudes and changing patterns of employment and prosperity. However, traditional perspectives and Marxist commitments to fixed social roles and collective identities create a very distinctive structure when moving towards a more inclusive education system. China’s ruling Communist Party has long railed against Western values, including concepts like multi-party democracy, individualism and self-advocacy.

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Education of Young Girls During war: A Look at the Global Situation

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Reprinted from GIMUN Chronicles

By Ghada Ben Saïd

Translated by Amy Reid

Photo: flickr.com/World Bank Photo Collection
Photo: flickr.com/World Bank Photo Collection

In the event of a crisis, it is children who are the first to suffer the effects of the political and economic instability of a country. In a country in conflict, schools are very often damaged or even destroyed, something which encourages parents to refuse to send their children to school. School buildings are also used as temporary residences or for military means. The authorities are so preoccupied with war that the education of these children is often pushed into the background. Many flee from zones of conflict, but for those who do not migrate, life becomes all the more difficult.  This is the case for example, in Syria. Since the beginning of the war, the rate of schooling in the country has dropped drastically.  Syria, despite having a rate of schooling of 95% in 2006, today has the second lowest rate of schooling in the world. Young girls are the first to bear the brunt of this.  Since the beginning of the war, the number of forced marriages amongst young Syrian girls has doubled.  Of the 101 million out-of-school children in the world today, the majority are girls, excluded from the education system and deprived of their basic right to education.

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The Role of Women in the Pacification Process – Interview with Mrs. Fatou Bensouda, Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court

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By Alice d’Eramo

Translated by Amy Wilcock

Mrs. Fatou Bensouda, Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court Source : FIFDH, crédits photo : Miguel Bueno

On 8 March 2015, International Women’s Day, the International Film Festival and Forum on Human Rights (FIFDH) organised a discussion in Geneva, on the role on women in the peace process.

The film Pray the Devil back to Hell, by Gini Reticker and Abigail E. Disney was shown during the event. The documentary tells the story of thousands of Liberian women who decided to join forces in spite of their religious differences in order to restore peace to their country. Indeed, between 1989 and 2003, civil war ravaged Liberia and Sierra Leone, causing more than 400,000 deaths. Traumatised and exhausted, these women together denounced the sordid daily life of conflict, including drugged child soldiers, sexual torture, packed and raided refugee camps, greed and the exploitation of natural resources. With their peaceful protests, they succeeded in putting pressure on political leaders to reach a peace agreement. They then pushed for the country’s disarmament and were involved in the democratic elections where the first female African president, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, was elected.

Finally, in 2012, Charles Taylor, former President of Liberia and rebel leader, was sentenced to 50 years in prison by the Special Court for Sierra Leone, for crimes against humanity and war crimes.

These events illustrate the tremendous power of peacekeeping intervention that women can have, as much on a local as on a global level. Therefore, better integrating women into the peacekeeping process is absolutely essential.

Protest women
Peaceful protest of Liberian women in Monrovia in July 2003, during the civil war -A shot from the documentary “Pray the Devil back to Hell”. Photo credits: Pewee Flomoku

Keeping the Liberian case in mind, outstanding figures were invited to discuss  the issue of the participation of women in the peacekeeping process, including; Fatou Bensouda, Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court; Alejandra Ancheita, Human Rights Activist, Mexican lawyer and 2014 Martin Ennals Award Laureate; and Bineta Diop, founder and President of Femmes Africa Solidarité (FAS), and Special Envoy to the Chairperson of the African Union Commission for Women, Peace and Security. The discussion was moderated by RTS journalist, Laurence Difelix.

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European Socialism: An Identity Crisis?

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By Frederick Brock

Photo by permission from Socialist Party, USA
Photo by permission from Socialist Party, USA

In recent years the socialist movements of Western Europe have been relatively quiet. Europe has experienced a significant economic crisis leading to unrest, uncertainty and usurpation by pre-crisis minority parties. Historically, turbulence such as this has acted as a catalyst for the emergence of radical movements and innovative ideas. This article focuses upon the apparent absence of these movements and ideas in contemporary socialism, considering three countries in detail: France, the United Kingdom and Spain.

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‘Crops’ or ‘Carats’? Gold mining and cocoa production in Ghana

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By Stephen Yeboah, Research Fellow, Africa Progress Panel

For the past two decades, gold mining and agriculture have contributed consistently to economic growth and development in Ghana. In 2013, gold mining contributed US$3,673 million in exports. Agriculture employed about 60 per cent of the active labour force and cocoa, the leading cash crop, contributed an estimated US$1,731 million in exports in 2013 (Government of Ghana 2013). While farming is the traditional source of livelihood, artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) has emerged in communities endowed with natural resources as a lucrative activity due to its remarkable income-generating potential.

Mining and agriculture may co-exist and interact to generate economic and social benefits, but at the same time they compete for land, water resources and labour. On the one hand, land is seized for mining that otherwise could be used for farming; labour is attracted away from agriculture into mining; and mining pollutes water needed for farm irrigation. On the other hand, mining generates money that supplements the income of farmers who branch out into mining, allowing them to improve the productivity of their farms through buying inputs like fertilizers, and hiring labour (see: Hilson and Garforth 2012; 2013). Despite the importance of mining and agriculture to socio-economic development, the dynamics of their interaction have seldom received attention and are sometimes underestimated by scholars, governments, corporate entities and donors. There is a need for greater understanding of the mining–agriculture nexus to ensure that the two interact in a positive and balanced manner, producing social and economic development without disrupting the livelihoods of rural people whose lives are tied to farming. Read the rest of this entry »

Perspectives on the Right to Privacy and Data Protection

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by Jan Alexander Linxweiler

Discussions regarding privacy and data protection are already part of our daily lives – especially after the so called “Snowden incident”. And why should they not? The friction between legitimate intelligence gathering and privacy protection as well as data protection are highly controversial. Within the discussions the inherent systematic differences among nations are often unearthed.

In this context this paper wants to introduce different perspectives on privacy and especially data protection within a descriptive assessment. Thus a short definition of privacy is necessary. Furthermore an overview on different approach methods is introduced. Finally the regulatory frameworks regarding these issues within the United States of America and the European Union as well the subsequent frictions are presented.

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The New Appeal of the South

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http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/files/2014/03/600-Abel-and-Sander-2014_Fig4_GlobalMigration.jpeg
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/files/2014/03/600-Abel-and-Sander-2014_Fig4_GlobalMigration.jpeg

By Alina Suvila

The flows of migrants have been enormous for long but the direction is currently changing. People from the Global South are now staying there instead of migrating to the North. The effects can be seen in power relations and the global economy where groups of emerging economies are dominating.

Emeritus professor Bimal Gosh from the Colombian School of Public Administration gave a presentation on the subject of migration on 8th May 2014 at the Graduate Institute (IHEID) in Geneva. In his presentation ‘The Changing Configuration of Global Migration: Why South-South migration matters’ he addresses the reasons of the change in directions of migration flows. Read the rest of this entry »

The European Asylum Policy – Failure of the Dublin III Regulation?

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 by Jan Alexander Linxweiler

It is already hard to imagine what it must feel like to be displaced, to be forced to leave home, to be persecuted and not welcomed anywhere. Even harder to imagine is the horror and despair of those who die while trying to come to a presumed secure and just system – to the EU. On the 30th of September 2013 more then 300 refugees experienced this ordeal off the Italian island of Lampedusa and died in the cause. Since then reports of tragic deaths at the European boarders are becoming more and more frequent, as the number of refugees are increasing. Subsequently the influx of refugees into the EU is increasing as well. At the same time the Common European Asylum System seams to fail in providing adequate protection and reception conditions; resulting in inhuman treatment and deaths.

This paper wants to offer a reasonable and possible solution within the existing Asylum System. Therefore it presents the Refuge Protection within the two dimensions: the Geneva Convention relating to the Status of Refugees and the Common European Asylum System. Within the Common European Asylum System the paper focuses upon the definition of the refugee status and the Dublin System. After presenting and discussing the weaknesses of this exact System the paper will present (in short) a possible solution to the raised problems and weaknesses. Read the rest of this entry »

Land grabbing – NGOs giving the UN a push

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by Tuuli Orasmaa

pepsi
On 15th April, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) released a news brief celebrating a second multinational company’s, PepsiCo’s, decision to support international guidelines on sustainable land tenure governance. The first one, Coca-Cola Company, made the move in November 2013. But why is this news worth noting? First of all, this may be seen as an important step in the fight against the global “land grabbing” phenomenon and secondly, this shows the power civil society organizations may have in issues the United Nations is struggling with. Read the rest of this entry »

Migration – Winners and Losers

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by Larissa Spescha

taken from: http://www.emergingmarkets.org/Article/2844077/Africa-must-avoid-repeating-commodity-boom-mistakes.html
taken from: http://www.emergingmarkets.org/Article/2844077/Africa-must-avoid-repeating-commodity-boom-mistakes.html

Migration. Nowadays migration is a heavily discussed topic in the media. It has become even more since the Swiss have adopted the ‘Stop mass immigration’ initiative that calls for quotas for all foreign nationals, on 9th February 2014. This desire to limit the number of foreigners shows the up-to-dateness of ‘migration’.

But what exactly are the effects of migration? Are they rather beneficial or disadvantageous for a country? Sir Paul Collin, a professor from Oxford University, analyses the impact migration has on countries, in particular developing countries. He shared his point of view at the conference entitled ‘Migration – Winners and Losers’ which was organized by the Graduate Institute in Geneva (IHEID) on 29th  April.
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Sustainability, Equity and Growth – Change is the Key

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Palais de Nations, Geneva

by Alina Suvila

It seems like a never-ending discussion about sustainable development and climate change. But there is a very good reason for it: now is the time to act. Three notable personalities discussed various possibilities for action in a public conference named ”Sustainable Development on a Warming Planet?” on 24th April 2014 at the Palais de Nations, Geneva. Read the rest of this entry »

A Ladder to Damascus – A film review

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by Leandra Hildbrand and Larissa Spescha

“A ladder to Damascus” is a 2013 drama directed by the Syrian filmmaker Mohamed Malas. It was screened at the “International Oriental Film Festival of Geneva” which took place from 4th to 13th of April. Read the rest of this entry »

Feminist Fangirl: A talk by IR legend J Ann Tickner

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by Sarah Payne

taken from: http://www.american.edu/uploads/profiles/large/SIS%2520Tickner.jpg
taken from: http://www.american.edu/uploads/profiles/large/SIS%2520Tickner.jpg

High on many reading lists on issues of security and feminism, J Ann Tickner is a familiar name for any International Relations student. For this reason, I was really excited to see her deliver a guest lecture at the Graduate Institute Geneva on 14th April 2014, entitled “Dealing with Difference: Problems and Possibilities for Dialogue in International Relations”, and tackling concepts like discrimination and epistemology of discourse  -as problematic and diverse as feminism – all within the hour. Read the rest of this entry »

The Evolving Space Security Regime: Implementation, Compliance and New Initiatives

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So long and thanks for all the fish?

by Euan O’Neill

euan

Whilst ancient astrologers used the position of the stars to tell the future and European explorers used the heavens to cross oceans and find ‘unknown’ territories, today we rely on signals from space to direct us to the nearest branch of Starbucks or to tell us the bus timetable. Read the rest of this entry »

Transnational feminisms, governance and development: a talk by Maitrayee Mukhopadhyay

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by Sarah Payne

http://vimeo.com/86510334
http://vimeo.com/86510334

On 10th April 2014, renowned social anthropologist Maitrayee Mukhopadhyay gave a talk at Geneva’s Graduate Insitute (IHEID) entitled “Gender knowledge and expertise in development”. In this lively, interesting and discursive talk Dr Mukhopadhyay discussed the last 30 years of global feminism, its achievements, internal divisions and scope for progress. Crucially though, she evaluated the role of transnational, local and grassroots feminisms in challenging the global hegemony of western feminism, and the implications of this for development. Read the rest of this entry »

Zaatari: the biggest Syrian town in Jordan

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by Pauline Mettan, translated by Charlotte Grey

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-26908587
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-26908587

Demographic pressure has become too much for our country. Jordan has opened its doors to more than 560,000 Syrian refugees since the conflict began, with 70% being women and children. Within a year, refugees will be 40% of our population. 96% of our energy is imported. Water is scarce. Our budget deficit is sky high. How can we keep up this poor balancing act when wave upon wave of immigrants are draining our already rare resources? Read the rest of this entry »

7 Days in Kigali, and how genocide ripped through Rwanda

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By Yura Azevedo, translated by Lucy Cumming

On Monday 7th April, Rwanda paid tribute to the most extreme genocide in history – 800,000 deaths in less than one hundred days – and one of the bloodiest wars of the 20th century. A mere 20 years ago: the Rwandan Tutsi genocide. Read the rest of this entry »

World Urban Forum 2014: Recipe for a better urban future

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by Lea Gleixner

25,000 meet in Medellín at UN-Habitat’s biennial conference

It is home to more than half of the world’s population, it is filled with human capacity, central to the big dream of millions, the cradle of new languages, music, art, the hope of many and likely to also be a traffic- and environmental nightmare: the city. Since the early 1970s, a great many of development strategies and programs had focused on rural development. Today both industrialized and developing countries are facing a challenge not quite unrelated, but definitely on the opposite side of the rural sphere – Urbanization.

From the April 5 – 11, around 25,000 experts from different disciplines and over 164 countries are gathered at the World Urban Forum in Medellín under this year’s conference theme “Urban equityin development – Cities for Life”. Read the rest of this entry »

Oil Conflict in The Orient: Japan’s Justification

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By Regina Oladipo

taken from: http://priceofoil.org/2012/09/19/japanese-china-conflict-all-about-oil/
taken from: http://priceofoil.org/2012/09/19/japanese-china-conflict-all-about-oil/

The tension between Japan and China has been increasing over the years, concerning island territory and the access that these islands have to oil and gas reserves. The Senkaku (Japan) and Diouyi (China) islands both have perimeters of 7 kilometers that overlap one another within the East and South China Sea. In the midst of this overlap, lies the approximate area of the Chunxiao gas field. The strength of historical disputes is so unfortunate in this case as Japan and China in negotiations is an economic and industrial force to be reckoned with. Journalists stress a need for “a bilateral trade between the two Asian powers estimated at some $300 billion”. This puts into perspective the worth of the natural resources in this particular area and equally magnifies the friction between China and Japan who both want to claim it themselves. Read the rest of this entry »

U.S. Energy Independence a Myth, Other Options Possible

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By Wassim Cornet and Easha Acharya

MW-BM068_oil_pr_MG_20130927150959

Politicians across the American political spectrum have long advocated an energy policy that would ultimately lead to a so-called “energy independence”. Time and time again, this independence has been hailed as the solution to the average American paying high gas prices. During the last presidential campaign, Michelle Bachman and Newt Gingrich even announced specific amounts to which they would lower gas prices ($2 and $2.50 per gallon, respectively). Read the rest of this entry »

France is alone in the Central African Republic

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By Juliette Darrousez and Julie Seemann-Ricard, translated by Charlotte Grey

From the very beginning, France has made international mobilisation in the Central African Republic a priority. In November 2013, Laurent Fabius, Minister for Foreign Affairs, announced that “France will be there” and “it will act so that the Central African Republic can hope again”. Operation Sangaris’ goal was to break the cycle of violence in the Central African Republic, and then give humanitarian aid to victims. The “anti-balakas” militia, created to defend the Séléka, have effectively lost sight of their initial goal and started targeting civilians. Read the rest of this entry »

Dancing in Jaffa – A film review

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by Friederike Wipfler

The heart-warming documentary ‘Dancing of Jaffa’ was screened as part of the ‘Geneva International Jewish Film Festival’ at Masion des Arts du Grütli which took place from 26th to 30th March 2014. Pierre Dulaine – a well-known ballroom dancer – initiates a dance project at Jewish – and Arab Israeli schools to create mutual understanding. Read the rest of this entry »