South America

Bumeràn Chavez: the Truth about Venezuela?

Posted on Updated on

by Francesca Paschetta

Cover image of
Cover image of “Bumeràn Chavez” by Emili Blasco.

Last February the agents of the Venezuelan security service arrested the mayor of Caracas, Antonio Ledezma, who is now detained in a military jail on charges of attempting a coup to overthrow President Maduro. It is not the first time that a member of the opposition is arrested, but what happened a few months ago represents an escalation in the regime’s repression, because Ledezma is an elected mayor.

The President has ordered the repression of all his political opponents. Many have been barred from the parliament or even exiled. Ordinary citizens who oppose the left-wing regime are barred from jobs in the public sector and from government benefits. Demonstrations, so far, have ended with the death of many protesters, including a number of students.
Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

The New Appeal of the South

Posted on Updated on

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/files/2014/03/600-Abel-and-Sander-2014_Fig4_GlobalMigration.jpeg
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/files/2014/03/600-Abel-and-Sander-2014_Fig4_GlobalMigration.jpeg

By Alina Suvila

The flows of migrants have been enormous for long but the direction is currently changing. People from the Global South are now staying there instead of migrating to the North. The effects can be seen in power relations and the global economy where groups of emerging economies are dominating.

Emeritus professor Bimal Gosh from the Colombian School of Public Administration gave a presentation on the subject of migration on 8th May 2014 at the Graduate Institute (IHEID) in Geneva. In his presentation ‘The Changing Configuration of Global Migration: Why South-South migration matters’ he addresses the reasons of the change in directions of migration flows. Read the rest of this entry »

World Urban Forum 2014: Recipe for a better urban future

Posted on Updated on

by Lea Gleixner

25,000 meet in Medellín at UN-Habitat’s biennial conference

It is home to more than half of the world’s population, it is filled with human capacity, central to the big dream of millions, the cradle of new languages, music, art, the hope of many and likely to also be a traffic- and environmental nightmare: the city. Since the early 1970s, a great many of development strategies and programs had focused on rural development. Today both industrialized and developing countries are facing a challenge not quite unrelated, but definitely on the opposite side of the rural sphere – Urbanization.

From the April 5 – 11, around 25,000 experts from different disciplines and over 164 countries are gathered at the World Urban Forum in Medellín under this year’s conference theme “Urban equityin development – Cities for Life”. Read the rest of this entry »

Survival and acceptance of nuclear energy in Brazil

Posted on Updated on

by Medgy Liburd

VLUU L200 / Samsung L200

Nuclear power plants are still a novelty in the Latin American and the Caribbean region. So far, there are two in Argentina, two in Mexico and two in Brazil (where a third one is on construction).

Like Argentina, Brazil had projects on nuclear energy technology based on natural uranium since the mid-1930s. After abandoning these first projects, the Brazilian government focused on the next plan: Angra 1 in 1985 (a nuclear power plant), followed by Angra 2 in 2001 and the construction of Angra 3 that should be operational by 2018. Read the rest of this entry »