East Asia

Japan’s ‘Yoshida Doctrine’ as It Stands Today

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by Nayana Das

Statue of former Prime Minister Yoshida Shigeru in Kitanomaru Park in Tokyo, Japan. Photo by  Toshihiro Gamo/ Flickr.
Statue of former Prime Minister Yoshida Shigeru in Kitanomaru Park in Tokyo, Japan.
Photo by Toshihiro Gamo/ Flickr.

The basic premise for Japan’s foreign policy in the aftermath of World War II was laid by then Prime Minister Yoshida Shigeru’s diplomatic ‘grand strategy’ known as the Yoshida Doctrine. The strategy which sought to make reconstruction of Japan’s domestic economy as the top policy priority, comprises of three key elements: reconstruction of domestic economy through an emphasis on economic relations overseas, maintenance of a low profile in international politics and reliance on security guarantees from the United States.

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China: Expelling “Western Values” from the Classroom

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Reprinted from GIMUN Chronicles

By Caroline Mountfield

AP Photo/Colour China Photo
AP/Colour China Photo

China has greatly expanded its higher education system as its economy has grown, with the total number of universities and colleges more than doubling in the past decade. Such an impressive outcome was only accomplished by giving priority to providing quality tertiary education across the country. In enacting an “educational innovation system”, China’s objective was to provide a proficient workforce to feed its socio-economic development. This implied setting up courses in key disciplines, talent development, improving research, widening participation and enhancing collaboration between institutions. As elsewhere, academic opportunities in China are shaped by a range of non-educational factors, such as social attitudes and changing patterns of employment and prosperity. However, traditional perspectives and Marxist commitments to fixed social roles and collective identities create a very distinctive structure when moving towards a more inclusive education system. China’s ruling Communist Party has long railed against Western values, including concepts like multi-party democracy, individualism and self-advocacy.

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Education of Young Girls During war: A Look at the Global Situation

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Reprinted from GIMUN Chronicles

By Ghada Ben Saïd

Translated by Amy Reid

Photo: flickr.com/World Bank Photo Collection
Photo: flickr.com/World Bank Photo Collection

In the event of a crisis, it is children who are the first to suffer the effects of the political and economic instability of a country. In a country in conflict, schools are very often damaged or even destroyed, something which encourages parents to refuse to send their children to school. School buildings are also used as temporary residences or for military means. The authorities are so preoccupied with war that the education of these children is often pushed into the background. Many flee from zones of conflict, but for those who do not migrate, life becomes all the more difficult.  This is the case for example, in Syria. Since the beginning of the war, the rate of schooling in the country has dropped drastically.  Syria, despite having a rate of schooling of 95% in 2006, today has the second lowest rate of schooling in the world. Young girls are the first to bear the brunt of this.  Since the beginning of the war, the number of forced marriages amongst young Syrian girls has doubled.  Of the 101 million out-of-school children in the world today, the majority are girls, excluded from the education system and deprived of their basic right to education.

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Oil Conflict in The Orient: Japan’s Justification

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By Regina Oladipo

taken from: http://priceofoil.org/2012/09/19/japanese-china-conflict-all-about-oil/
taken from: http://priceofoil.org/2012/09/19/japanese-china-conflict-all-about-oil/

The tension between Japan and China has been increasing over the years, concerning island territory and the access that these islands have to oil and gas reserves. The Senkaku (Japan) and Diouyi (China) islands both have perimeters of 7 kilometers that overlap one another within the East and South China Sea. In the midst of this overlap, lies the approximate area of the Chunxiao gas field. The strength of historical disputes is so unfortunate in this case as Japan and China in negotiations is an economic and industrial force to be reckoned with. Journalists stress a need for “a bilateral trade between the two Asian powers estimated at some $300 billion”. This puts into perspective the worth of the natural resources in this particular area and equally magnifies the friction between China and Japan who both want to claim it themselves. Read the rest of this entry »

Correa and his European campaign

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By Claire Gossart and Simon Rousseau, translated by Charlotte Grey

2014-04-03-at-5-23-16-am

On 6 November 2013 at the University of Paris, Ecuador president Rafael Correa delivered his views on resolving the European crisis, by drawing upon past Latin-American lessons.

The Latin America of the 1980s would have fallen victim to an imperialist plot, led by the United States, who were hoping to once again take control of the sub-continent through treacherous means. Following the 1970s crisis, the majority of Latin American countries were insolvent. They were denied international loans, but were also suffering from the sharp increase in interest rates from places such as the Federal Reserve in the United States. The IMF “kindly” offered aid by granting loans to pay off their debts, but while eventually imposing conditions as underhand as they were drastic. International institutions have hidden their economic ideology in science. Correa had a mission in going to France, and it was partly to enlighten ill-advised Europeans. At last, Latin America is the one giving advice. Read the rest of this entry »

Washington’s efforts to put and end to North Korean proliferation, not enough?

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by Nayana Das

taken from: http://www.glocal.org.hk/articles/14217
taken from: http://www.glocal.org.hk/articles/14217

In an alarming development last week, North Korea demonstrated its ballistic missile capabilities by launching two mid-range missiles, a move which makes global observers very nervous. South Korean Defense Ministry alleges that North Korea also test-fired 30 short-range rockets on Saturday, the umpteenth addition to a series of tests conducted this year. Marie Harf, State Department spokeswoman, said yesterday that these launches were “a troubling and provocative escalation that the United States takes very seriously”. Clearly, the North has wasted no time in intensifying its nuclear weapons programme, especially its pursuit of ICBMs. Read the rest of this entry »

‘My favourite word is freedom’ – Human Rights Council on North Korea

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by Tuuli Orasmaa

On Monday, 17th March 2014 the 25th regular session of the Human Rights Council in Geneva focussed on an important issue of the four-week conference: the Interactive Dialogue on Human Rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK). In one of the most eagerly expected events of the Council, the Commission of Inquiry[1] presented its report on the human rights situation in the DPRK followed by comments from the member states of the Council, as well as from certain human rights organizations.

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