Culture

The Ottoman Empire : is it back to life in modern day Turkey?

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By Camille de Félice.

Translated by Matthew Hall.

The period following the attempted coup d’état on 15 July 2016 in Turkey has been characterised by efforts to reshape our understanding of historic events. This historical revision is a regular occurrence in Turkish history since the foundation of the Republic in 1923 by Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, who placed an emphasis on the pre-Islamic history of the Turkish people and considered that the Ottoman Empire was reactionary and needed to be consigned to the past. This wish to manipulate history saw a turning point through the arrival in power of the AKP (Justice and Development Party) in 2002. The AKP, which inherited the tradition of political Islam in Turkey, has positioned itself to be the voice of a majority that had been too often ignored and even held in contempt by the elites during Atatürk’s rule, and its takeover of political power allowed Turkey to reclaim the Islamic and Ottoman eras as their own. The increase of symbols representative of Ottoman power[1] that are sometimes used as decorations, such as stickers on car windscreens and mobile phone cases, as well as the large number of cafes bearing the name ‘Ottoman’, the growth of ice-cream sellers dressed in clothing corresponding to the image that Europe has of the Ottoman Empire and the popularity of this style in furniture shops, feature among those of the imperial legacy that were previously suppressed. Read the rest of this entry »

Financing projects for disadvantaged children worldwide : The United Nations Annual International Bazaar 2016

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By Nataliya Borys

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Music around the world.

The 22 November 2016 at the Palais des Nations in Geneva there was an annual United Nations bazaar’s event, presented as “one of the most significant events in the life of the UN community in Geneva.”[1] What is that, this international bazaar? Which is the goal of this bazaar? Can common people take part in it? Our reporter and editor-in-chief, Nataliya Borys, wanted to know more about this event and could participate in this bazaar as a journalist of GIMUN. Read the rest of this entry »

A Ladder to Damascus – A film review

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by Leandra Hildbrand and Larissa Spescha

“A ladder to Damascus” is a 2013 drama directed by the Syrian filmmaker Mohamed Malas. It was screened at the “International Oriental Film Festival of Geneva” which took place from 4th to 13th of April. Read the rest of this entry »

7 Days in Kigali, and how genocide ripped through Rwanda

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By Yura Azevedo, translated by Lucy Cumming

On Monday 7th April, Rwanda paid tribute to the most extreme genocide in history – 800,000 deaths in less than one hundred days – and one of the bloodiest wars of the 20th century. A mere 20 years ago: the Rwandan Tutsi genocide. Read the rest of this entry »

Dancing in Jaffa – A film review

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by Friederike Wipfler

The heart-warming documentary ‘Dancing of Jaffa’ was screened as part of the ‘Geneva International Jewish Film Festival’ at Masion des Arts du Grütli which took place from 26th to 30th March 2014. Pierre Dulaine – a well-known ballroom dancer – initiates a dance project at Jewish – and Arab Israeli schools to create mutual understanding. Read the rest of this entry »